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Honda Integra History






 
First Generation

Second Generation

Third Generation

Third Generation after Type R

Fourth Generation
The Honda Integra (sold in the USA as the Acura Integra and Acura RSX) is an automobile manufactured by Honda.

Acura Integra (North America)

First Generation 1985-1989

The Acura Integra was introduced to North America in 1986, one year later than its release as the Honda Integra in Japan. It was available in either a 3 or 5-door hatchback body style or a four-door sedan, and came standard with a 1.6 litre DOHC 16v engine, which was, at the time, revolutionary technology in a car of that class.

The Acura Integra was cutting edge at its time, but it had a solid rear axle with trailing arms, and a torsion bar with struts front suspension. Although being derived from the Honda Civic platform, the Integra had a few minor upgrades: it had larger front disc brakes rotors than the Civic, and disc brakes in the back instead of drums. Its 113 hp DOHC Fuel injected 16-valve engine was quite powerful compared to other 4-cylinder engines available at the time; for example, the most powerful engine Honda had the year before introducing the Integra was the SOHC 16 valve Fuel-injected four in the CRX Si, and it only made 90 hp. This new engine could effortlessly rev up to its 7,000 rpm redline, but did not have very much low-end torque. It could accelerate from 0-60 mph in 9.5 s and had a 16 s quarter mile time. After five years of production, and 227,966 units sold, the first generation was retired.

Second Generation 1990-1993

In 1990 the second-generation Integra was released. All the 2nd generation Integras came with a new 1.8 litre DOHC engine. The five-door hatchback was discontinued, while the sedan and three-door hatchback continued to be available. In 1992 Honda's VTEC system was introduced in a 1.7 litre engine in the GS-R model. The standard engine produced 130 hp (up to 140 hp for 1992-1993) and the VTEC GS-R engine produced 160 hp.

The second generation Integra was the first Honda car to receive the well-known B-series engine. This engine produced 130 hp at 6,000 rpm and 121 ft·lbf of torque at 5,000 rpm. With a red-line of 6,750 RPM the B18A was a high-revving engine that rewarded the driver who pushed it hard. In 1992 the engine received a new ECU and some other minor changes, which raised the power to 140 hp at 6,000 rpm. Also in 1992 the first GS-R model was released to North America. The Integra was second for the VTEC engine treatment. The first North American model to get it was the exotic NSX in 1991. This new engine, the B17A, displaced 1.7 litres and produced 160 hp at 7,500 rpm. Its torque peak was 117 ft·lbf at 7,000 but 100 ft·lbf was available at only 2,500 rpm. The B17A also had an 8,000 RPM redline.

There were four different trim levels for the second generation Integra, RS, LS, GS and GS-R. The first three all received the B18A and the GS-R received the rare B17A Engine. New this year was the GS trim level. This had many more luxury features then the other trim levels and added to Acura's reputation as a luxury car manufacturer. The Integra went through a slight update in 1992 with new front/rear bumpers and a more powerful engine. Also the steering wheel was changed and the taillights now had an amber section instead of the red and white of the 1990-1991.


  • 262,285 Units sold from 1990-1993

Third Generation 1994-1997

In 1994, a completely new third generation was introduced. It was based off the newer 1992 Civic chassis and was the last Integra to have the double wishbone suspension at all four corners. This generation was available in various trim packages including the LS, GS, GS-R and the end-all Type R.

The third generation Integra produced quite a stir with its new headlights and body-work. At first there was some controversy over the styling, but soon it settled down. The third generation Integra soon became the most recognizable Integra ever. When "Integra" was mentioned, the third generation was what came to mind.

The B18A engine received some revisions and became the B18B, its power figures went up slightly. The RS, LS, and GS Integras now made 142 hp at 6300 rpm and 127 ft·lbf of torque at 5200 rpm. All three have a compression ratio of 9.2:1. The GS-R's engine was also changed. Its displacement was increased to 1.8 litres and it produced 170 hp at 7600 rpm and 128 ft·lbf of torque at 6200 rpm. Its compression ratio was 10.0:1. This power increase was assisted by a new dual stage intake manifold.

The Type R was added to the line up in 1997 as a limited production road racer. Powered by a highly tuned, hand-finished 1.8 litre that produces 195hp at 8000rpm, it has more hp per litre than the Ferrari F355's V8. With maximum torque of 130 ft·lbf not available till 7000 rpm, it needs to rev right to the 8400rpm redline to give its best. The VTEC switch-over at 5,700 rpm gives the engine a split personality that enthusiasts love, and it's still one of the most advanced engines in it's class. It needs premium fuel to prevent knock, as it has a high compression ratio of 10.6:1.

A 1994-1997 Integra can be differentiated from the 1998-2001 by its more tame front bumper and its red and amber taillights.

The B-Series engine once again powered the whole Integra line. The RS, LS, and GS were powered by the B18B. The GS-R received the VTEC B18C and the Type R uses the B18C5.

Type R

The Type R was the pinnacle of the Integra line. It had many exclusive features found on no other Integra.

The B18C5 Type R engine contained more key differences than just some manual assembly steps and an increased redline. The B16A's cylinder head returned for an encore, with differently shaped combustion chambers and intake ports compared to the regular B18C in the GS-R. Molybdenum-coated, high compression pistons and stronger-but-lighter connecting rods strengthened the reciprocating assembly. Two extra counterweights on the crankshaft altered its vibration modes to enhance durability at high RPM. The intake valves were reshaped with a thinner stem and crown that reduced weight and improved flow. The intake ports were given a minor port and polish. Stiffer valve springs resisted float on more aggressive camshafts. Intake air was now drawn from inside the fender well, for a colder, denser charge. That intake fed a short-runner intake manifold with a larger throttle body for better breathing. An improved stainless steel exhaust collector with more gentle merge angles, a change to a larger, consistent piping diameter, flared internal piping in the muffler allowed easier exit of gasses. A retuned engine computer also contributed to improve power output.

The transmission was upgraded with lower and closer gear ratios in second through fifth gears, in order to take advantage of the additional rev range. The U.S. version retained the same 4.4 final drive throughout the Type R's production run, unlike the Japanese market version, which in 1998 changed to a 4.785 final drive along with revised gearing. The clutch disk has a slightly smaller swept area, for improved bite. The GS-R's open differential was replaced with a torque-sensing limited slip type.

The chassis received enhancements in the form of reinforcements to the rear wheel wells, roof rail, and other key areas. "Performance rods," chassis braces that were bolted in place, were added to the rear trunk wall and rear subframe. The front strut tower bar was replaced with a stronger aluminum piece. Camber rigidity was improved at the rear by increasing wheel bearing span by 10mm. The Type R's body also received a new functional rear wing, body-colored rocker panels, and 5 bolt hubs with special lightweight Type-R wheels. Under those wheels was a much larger set of disk brakes front and back. The tires were upgraded to Bridgestone RE010 "summer" tires.

The Type R received very aggressive tuning in its suspension settings. All soft rubber bushings were replaced with much stiffer versions, as much as 5.3 times higher in durometer readings. The springs and dampers were much stiffer, with a 10 mm reduction in ride height. The rear anti-roll bar diameter was increased to 22mm in diameter. The front anti-roll bar retained the same size, although the end links were changed to a more responsive sealed ball joint as opposed to a rubber bushing on the lesser models. The result was a chassis with very responsive, racetrack-ready handling that ably absorbed mid-corner bumps well. Mild oversteer was easy to induce with a lift of the throttle, and during steady-state cornering the car maintained a slight tail-out stance.

The interior was stripped down to reduce weight. The air conditioning system was removed and nearly all the sound-dampening material was eliminated. This provided for a much noisier ride, but since the Type-R was a racecar for the street, most owners didn't mind. The Type R was a no-compromise sports car, and it showed the world what Honda was capable of.

  • 301,102 Units sold from 1994-2001

Third Generation 1998-2001

Despite some popular demand for a new Integra model for 1998, Acura chose to give the third-generation model a slight facelift and rerelease it. The 1998 Integra has slightly larger headlights and a more aggressive front bumper. It also has all-red taillights and a revised rear bumper. The GS-R edition received 5-spoke "blade" style wheels as a stylistic change.

Once again, the Type-R saw a limited release in the US.

Fourth Generation 2002-present

The fourth generation Integra, produced from 2002 onwards, is called the Acura RSX. It once again is an attempt by Acura to move more upscale and is a much more luxurious than the previous generation. It also has an entirely new engine, the K-series, which is considered by some to be the best engine Honda has ever released.

Awards

The Integra was on Car and Driver magazine's annual Ten Best list six times, in 1987, 1988, and 1994 through 1997. The GS-R model was called out specifically in 1994 and 1995. It made a return on the Ten Best as the Acura RSX for 2002 and 2003

Honda Integra (Europe)

The Honda Integra was the successor to the rather odd Honda Quint, a five-door hatchback off the Accord platform and using bodywork from the Honda Civic which was known outside Japan as the Honda Quintet. It was also briefly sold in Australia badged as a Rover, as was the Quintet.

It was introduced in 1985 as the Honda Quint Integra, and was available in either a 3 door or 5 door bodystyle or a four-door sedan. A DOHC 16v engine was optional, which was revolutionary technology for a car in its class at the time.

In 1989 the second-generation Integra was released. The five-door hatchback was discontinued, while the sedan and three-door hatchback continued to be available. Honda's VTEC system was introduced in the XSi and RSi models.

In 1994, a restyled third generation was introduced. This generation was available in various trim packages including the LS, GS, GS-R, and ultimately, the Type R in 1996. All engines were DOHC 1.8 liter fours, but the GS-R added VTEC (Honda's variable valve timing system) and a dual-stage intake manifold to produce 170 hp. The Type-R was a limited production factory racer, making 195 hp from its hand-built engine.

The fourth generation Integra, produced from 2003 onwards, has an entirely new 2.0 L engine with much more potential.

Honda Integra (Japan)

The Honda Integra was the successor to the rather odd Honda Quint, a five-door hatchback off the Accord platform and using bodywork from the Honda Civic which was known outside Japan as the Honda Quintet. It was also briefly sold in Australia badged as a Rover, as was the Quintet.

It was introduced in 1985 as the Honda Quint Integra, and was available in either a 3 door or 5 door bodystyle or a four-door sedan. A DOHC 16v engine was optional, which was revolutionary technology for a car in its class at the time.

In 1989 the second-generation Integra was released. The five-door hatchback was discontinued, while the sedan and three-door hatchback continued to be available. Honda's VTEC system was introduced in the XSi and RSi models, which utilized the 1.6l DOHC VTEC B16a producing 160ps in the manual transmission models. Other models (TXi, RX, RXi, ZX, ZXi) used the 1.6l SOHC ZC with either dual carburetors or fuel injection. In 1991 the Integra received a facelift, with different front and rear bumpers, interior changes and 10ps more for the VTEC models. A new model, the ESi was added to the range at the same time - it was powered by the same 1.8l DOHC non-VTEC as used in the American market cars and was available only as a sedan with an automatic transmission.

In 1993, a restyled third generation with a distinctive four round headlight front was introduced. This generation was again available in either a three door hatchback or four door sedan configuration. The SOHC zc continued to be used on the ZX and ZXi models, the ESi retained the B18b while the Si-VTEC used a 1.8l DOHC VTEC B18c producing 180ps. A four wheel drive model was also produced, only available in sedan with the fuel injected SOHC ZC.

The four headlight look was not generally well receieved in Japan, so in 1995 the Integra was facelifted. The new model range consisted of the Ti, Xi, XI-G, Xi 4wd which all used the fuel injected SOHC ZC, and the SiR, SiRII and SiR-G which all used the DOHC VTEC B18c. A lightweight race oriented verions, the Type R was also introduced - this was powered by a special 200ps version of the B18c and had different suspension settings and numerous other changes.

The fourth generation Integra, produced from 2002 onwards, is called the Acura RSX in North America and Hong Kong. In Japan, Australia and New Zealand it is still called the Honda Integra.








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